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Invasive Species Invasive Plants

Invasive Species What’s the difference between a “weed” and an “invasive plant”? A weed is simply a plant growing in a place where it’s not wanted. It might be a problem locally, but it generally doesn’t spread to become a large-scale problem in natural areas.

An invasive plant is a non-native plant with very high reproductive potential and the ability to establish across long distances (for example, it might produce seeds that can spread by wind or by animals). An invasive plant can become established in natural areas, and disrupt natural communities by outcompeting native plants.

An invasive species grows/reproduces and spreads rapidly, establishes over large areas, and persists. Species that become invasive succeed due to favorable environmental conditions and lack of natural predators, competitors and diseases that normally regulate their populations.

This includes a wide variety of plants, insects and animals from exotic places. As invasive species spread and take over ecosystems, they decrease biodiversity by threatening the survival of native plants and animals. In fact, invasive species are a significant threat to almost half of the native U.S. species currently listed as federally endangered.

In addition to negatively impacting ecosystems, invasive species are also costly. It is very expensive to prevent, monitor and control the spread of invasives, not to mention the damage to crops, fisheries, forests, and other resources. Invasives cost the US $137 billion annually. Some of the most harmful species cost in excess of $100 million annually.

Sometimes you will see invasive species referred to as exotic, alien, or non-indigenous species. The problem with these names is that they only refer to the non-native part of the definition above. Many exotic or alien species do not cause harm to our economy, our environment, or our health. In fact, the vast majority of "introduced" species do not survive and only about 15% of those that do go on to become "invasive" or harmful.

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Learn more about native plants, get involved, and spread the word!

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The purpose of this document is to outline two methods of applying herbicide to reduce and control the competition created from re-sprouting hardwood species (primarily oak, and yaupon holly). The goal is to allow the native loblolly pine to again become a significant component of the next forest woodland.

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Policy Resolution 13-02: Western Governors support coordinated, prevention efforts of early detection and rapid response with multistate management and eradication actions to limit or eliminate introductions and improve control of invasive species expansion. Programs for the control and/or eradication of invasive species must result in more on-the-ground prevention, management and eradication.

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This 2nd edition of the NBCI’s annual “State of the Bobwhite” report provides the most comprehensive assessment ever compiled on the current state of bobwhite conservation in the US.

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ABSTRACT Barkbeetles (Coleoptera:Curculionidae:Scolytinae) have been an important historic and current factor affecting pine forest production in the southern United States. Although tree mortality to bark beetles often detracts from forest management goals, the natural role of barkbeetles is canopy opening, thinning, and diversification of stand structure and composition, effects that contribute to some ecosystem services in forests managed for multiple uses. Strategies to prevent barkbeetle outbreaks exploit their sensitivity to host tree spacing and reliance on pheromones to attract sufficient numbers to overwhelm tree defenses. Tree species selection at planting or through selective thinning can favor pine species that are more tolerant of site conditions and resistant to bark beetles. Precommercial or commercial thinning improves tree condition and creates barriers to beetle population growth and spread. Remedial options include  salvage harvest, pheromones for trap-out or disruption of host location, and white paint to disrupt the dark silhouette of the tree bole. Given the labor costs and trade-offs among tactics and the marginal profitability of fiber and timber production, harvest in advance of,or salvage harvest after, barkbeetle attack often is the favored management strategy. However, this strategy is not as appropriate in public forests managed for values provided by older, more vulnerable trees. High-value sites for cultural or endangered species protection may require use of more expensive management options.

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What’s a quail worth? The short answer — as it relates to a wild Texas quail — is $253 each, according to a recently completed survey of Texas quail hunters.

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ExFor is an Internet-accessible database containing information on forest pests that can be used by workers worldwide. This document describes the guidelines to be followed by contributors to the ExFor database in evaluating exotic forest pests and in submitting background information to the database.

Regulatory and forest protection agencies, as well as researchers and field workers in forest health and related fields, will benefit from the ready availability of information on a wide variety of pests with potential to become established in North American forests. The information is presented in such a way as to be useful for many purposes. Although the emphasis in the pest risk assessment model developed for this project is on potential establishment and impact, information on pathways for introduction and means of dispersal is provided in the Pest Facts Sheets. It is anticipated that this information will prove useful for the assessment and management of introduced pests, wood products and other commodities from offshore sources.  

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The purpose of the Southern Region (R8) Non-Native Invasive Species Strategy is to provide an effective interdisciplinary framework to implement Non-Native Invasive Species (NNIS) management programs. The implementation will include R8 National Forests, State and Private Forestry, and Research and Development programs as applicable.

The goal of the R8 NNIS Program in the South is to reduce, minimize, or eliminate the potential for introduction, establishment, spread, and impact of non-native invasive species across all landscapes and ownerships. The vision for this program is to protect native ecosystems and biodiversity, as well as begin restoration of desired ecological functions or components after NNIS removal. Read More »


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Procedures have been developed in this manual to address the transport of pest and invasive species through equipment movement. This manual provides uniform guidelines for inspecting and cleaning vehicles and equipment to help prevent the spread of pest and invasive species during Bureau of Reclamation activities.
 

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This is a guide for field detection and for treating field gear to prevent the spread of New Zealand mudsnails. It is intended for researchers, monitoring crews, watershed survey groups, and anyone else who travels frequently between aquatic or riparian locations.
 

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Summarizes biology of wild pigs, history of introduction and range of occurence within the U.S., and ecological and economic impacts, with suggestions for management strategies. Read More »


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Invasive Species introduced into the United States from around the globe are affecting plant and animal communities on our farms, ranches and coasts; and in our parks, waters, forests, and backyards. As global climate patterns shift, the distribution of species will change, and so will the susceptibility of particular habitats to the impacts of new species introductions. Human activity such as trade, travel and tourism have all increased substantially, increasing the speed and volume of species movement to unprecedented levels. Invasive species are often unintended hitchhikers on cargo and other trade conveyances. Still more species are deliberately introduced as pets, ornamental plants, crops, food, or for recreation, pest control or other purposes. Most nonnative species, including most of our sources of food and fiber, are not harmful; and many are highly beneficial. A small percentage of nonnative species cause great harm to the environment, the economy or human health. Nonnative species that cause harm are collectively known as invasive species. Read More »


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Non-native plants, animals, and microorganisms found outside of their natural range can become invasive. While many of these are harmless because they do not reproduce or spread in their new surroundings, other non-native species (NNIS) are considered invasive if they can cause harm to the economy, ecology or human health of the new environment. These species thrive in new areas because they establish relatively quickly, tolerate a wide range of conditions, are easily dispersed, and are no longer limited by the diseases, predators, and parasites that kept their populations in check in their native range.

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Constructing a water garden is a unique and enjoyable way to accent a property. There are many types of aquatic plants and animals commonly used in water gardens including water lettuce, cattails and koi. Many of the popular species are not native to the area or watershed in which they are being planted.

Introduced species are defined as any individual, group, subspecies or population that enters an aquatic ecosystem outside of its historical native range. These species  may be plants or animals and may arrive from different countries or from different locations of the same country. Non-native species like goldfish and purple loosestrife, are now prevalent in many regions across the U.S. after first being used as ornamentals. Once established, introduced species may cause ecological and economic problems and  can be difficult if not impossible to control or eradicate.

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Rod Pinkston, a former U.S. Army Master Sergeant and war veteran, may well be one of the world's best and most intuitive wild hog hunters in the world.

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Many forest managers are unknowingly introducing and spreading invasive plants on their lands through management practices they implement. These practices, ranging from traditional silvicultural management to wildlife enhancement and land-use conversion practices, all influence invasive plant growth, reproduction, and dispersal. Recognizing and predicting the response of individual species to these practices will enable managers to take steps to prevent or reduce the impact of invasive plants on their land. Many of these species eliminate all productive uses on infested sites and are very expensive to control and/or eradicate. Knowing which invasive plants are common in your region and being able to identify them aids in quickly responding to new threats. Monitoring disturbed areas and proper sanitation of equipment helps prevent new infestations. Issues such as when and how to use prescribed fire and how different invasive plants will respond can be confusing and overwhelming. This publication integrates vegetation management guidelines and control techniques with silvicultural practices, such as prescribed fire, harvest  techniques, site preparation, timber stand improvement, and wildlife plantings, in a format that will help the manager understand the relationship of management  practices and invasive plants.


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Aquatic nuisance species (ANS) are nonindigenous species that threaten the diversity or abundance of native species, the ecological stability of infested waters, and/or any commercial, agricultural, aquacultural, or recreational activities dependent on such waters. ANS include nonindigenous species that may occur within inland, estuarine, or marine waters and that presently or potentially threaten ecological processes or natural resources. The term ANS is often used interchangeably with aquatic invasive species, the preferred term of Federal and State managers. An aquatic invasive species is defined as a species not native to the ecosystem under consideration whereby introduction of this species does or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or threaten human health.

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Feral animals are those that have returned to an untamed state after having been domesticated.  Such is the case with almost all the wild pigs in North America.  Although some of the truly wild Eurasian or “Russian” boars have been brought to the U.S., they are rare, and most feral hogs descend from livestock or are a hybrid of the two species.

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Excerpts from the Texas Wildlife Action Plan (WAP) applicable to private landowners.

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Provides instructions for artificial regeneration, site prep, seedings and planting to re-establish longleaf pine.  The guidelines conclude, “Longleaf pine has many desirable characteristics for landowners who have multiple-use forest management objectives. On appropriate sites, and with careful attention to detail during the regeneration phase, it is possible to enjoy the versatility of this species without compromising growth rates.” Read More »


According to the US Fish and Wildlife Service, endemic species are native species that are confined to a certain region or having a comparatively restricted distribution.  For example, the Joshua Tree is endemic to the Mojave Desert.  In other words, endemics, wherever they are located, are unique to their region.  In general, the greater the isolation or specialized nature of the habitat, the more numerous the endemics.  Thus, according to Britannica Encyclopedia online, species on remote oceanic islands tend to be almost 100% endemic.

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Invasive Species Native species
Invasive Species Native plants help conserve water, improve water quality, and provide wildlife habitats. Related activities are being held throughout the week and at many sites around town.

Texas has many native animals and birds, as well as introduced species. More than 540 species of birds — about three fourths of all different species found in the United States — have been identified in Texas. Some 142 species of animals, including some that today are extremely rare, are found in Texas.

The types of plants found in Texas vary widely from one region to the next. This is due to the amount and frequency of rainfall, diversity of soils, and the number of frost-free days. From the forests of East Texas to the deserts of West Texas, from the grassy plains of North Texas to the semi-arid brushlands of South Texas, plant species change continuously.

More than 100 million acres of Texas are devoted to grazing, both for domestic and wild animals. This is the largest single use of land in the state. More than 80 percent of the acreage is devoted to range in the Edwards Plateau, Cross Timbers and Prairies, South Texas Plains, and Trans-Pecos Mountains and Basins.

The Houston metro region consists predominantly of Gulf Prairies and Marshes that cover approximately 10 million acres of the state. There are two subunits: (a) the marsh and salt grasses immediately at tidewater, and (b) a little farther inland, a strip of bluestems and tall grasses, with some gramas in the western part. Many of these grasses make excellent grazing.

Oaks, elm, and other hardwoods grow to some extent, especially along streams, and the area has some post oak and brushy extensions along its borders. Much of the Gulf Prairies is fertile farmland, and the area is well suited for cattle.

Principal grasses of the Gulf Prairies are tall bunchgrasses, including big bluestem, little bluestem, seacoast bluestem, indiangrass, eastern gamagrass, Texas wintergrass, switchgrass, and gulf cordgrass. Saltgrass occurs on moist saline sites.

Heavy grazing has changed the native vegetation in many cases so the predominant grasses are the less desirable broomsedge bluestem, smutgrass, threeawns, tumblegrass, and many other inferior grasses. Other plants that have invaded the productive grasslands include oak underbrush, Macartney rose, huisache, mesquite, prickly pear, ragweed, bitter sneezeweed, broomweed, and others.

Vegetation of the Gulf Marshes consists primarily of sedges, bullrush, flat-sedges, beakrush and other rushes, smooth cordgrass, marshhay cordgrass, marsh millet, and maidencane. The marshes are grazed best during winter.

Why are native plants important?
Invasive Species Native plants form the historical basis of our landscape, provide food and habitat for animals, and serve as natural sources of food, fiber, and other products.

Native plants are acclimated to local climate conditions and soils, provide habitat for wildlife, typically require less water and maintenance once established, and do not rely on chemical fertilizers and pesticides to thrive. These homegrown plants also give us a sense of place and help maintain the region's wide variety of flora and fauna.
Invasive Species Texas Plant Information Database
The Texas Plant Information Database (TPID) contains comprehensive information about native and a few selected naturalized plant species that have value for erosion control and wildlife use. It provides the user an opportunity to query and select species that have application for landscape enhancement or restoration. The selection of appropriate plants is based on specific site characteristics and management objectives.

This project is still evolving.Therefore, we welcome comments and suggestions. We hope the program is user-friendly as well as applicable. Species can be added to the database and modifications of existing data can be made where needed.In case there is a plant you would like to see added to the database, please e-mail the plant name to us at the address below. If the plant meets the criteria for addition to the database, a blank form will be mailed to you to fill out and send back.

Criteria for Including Plants in the Database TPID is based upon plants that have desirable characteristics and, when planted in appropriate associations, can provide vegetated landscapes similar to those that naturally occur in Texas. These plants include trees, shrubs, vines, forbs, grasses, and marsh plants. This database contains information on specific plants (e.g. wooly croton) as well as groups of plants (e.g. Croton spp.) for which data for several plants are grouped together.

There are several ways you can search the database for native species:
Search by Common Name
Search by Scientific Name
Search by Code
Search by Ecological Region
Search by County
Search the database by Specific Location

Find a nursery that sells plants native to TexasH »

Learn more about Native Species Learn more about Native Species


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Learn more about native plants, get involved, and spread the word!

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Excerpts from the Texas Wildlife Action Plan (WAP) applicable to private landowners.

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In recent years, there has been increased interest in establishing native warm season grasses (NWSG) and forbs as wildlife habitat. Commonly known as prairie or prairie grass, native grasslands and savannas, a forest/grassland complex with less than 50% tree coverage, historically dominated the landscape across much of the United States. These grasses and forbs grow during the warmer months of the year as opposed to cool season grasses such as fescue and brome.

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Best Management Practices
Best Management Practices, or BMPs, are developed by experienced practitioners or management and research organizations to improve land management outcomes. Although general wildlife, habitat, or agricultural or water quality BMPs may be helpful for many species of wildlife, some species have unique requirements that are highly limiting to their populations.

A good example is the Wood Duck, a species of waterfowl that declined in the late 18th century as a result of overhunting and declines in its preferred bottomland habitat. According to the US Geological Survey, “by the beginning of the 20th century, wood ducks had virtually disappeared from much of their former range.” The Wood Duck is a cavity nester and requires mature trees and snags for nesting. As this type of habitat develops slowly and can be rare under modern forest management regimes, the specific practice of placing and maintaining wood duck boxes began in the 1930s to artificially boost populations.

Specific guidelines for the correct dimensions, construction and placement of wood duck boxes has helped make the practice widespread, playing a key part in the comeback of the Wood Duck nationwide. Again, USGS states, “The story of the Wood Duck is an example of how active wildlife management techniques can have a tremendous effect on the overall success of an individual species.”

Invasive Species Best Management Practice Downloads

Aquatic Weed Management Control Methods

A discussion of the main types of aquatic weeds, plus prevention; biological, chemical, and mechanical control; and integrated weed management. A list of all Southern Regional Aquaculture Center factsheets (more than 150) are available at https://srac.tamu.edu/index.cfm/event/viewAllSheets/




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ABSTRACT Barkbeetles (Coleoptera:Curculionidae:Scolytinae) have been an important historic and current factor affecting pine forest production in the southern United States. Although tree mortality to bark beetles often detracts from forest management goals, the natural role of barkbeetles is canopy opening, thinning, and diversification of stand structure and composition, effects that contribute to some ecosystem services in forests managed for multiple uses. Strategies to prevent barkbeetle outbreaks exploit their sensitivity to host tree spacing and reliance on pheromones to attract sufficient numbers to overwhelm tree defenses. Tree species selection at planting or through selective thinning can favor pine species that are more tolerant of site conditions and resistant to bark beetles. Precommercial or commercial thinning improves tree condition and creates barriers to beetle population growth and spread. Remedial options include  salvage harvest, pheromones for trap-out or disruption of host location, and white paint to disrupt the dark silhouette of the tree bole. Given the labor costs and trade-offs among tactics and the marginal profitability of fiber and timber production, harvest in advance of,or salvage harvest after, barkbeetle attack often is the favored management strategy. However, this strategy is not as appropriate in public forests managed for values provided by older, more vulnerable trees. High-value sites for cultural or endangered species protection may require use of more expensive management options.

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Conservation buffers such as filter strips, riparian buffers, grassed waterways, and field borders are especially applicable to southeastern landscapes and have multiple environmental benefits while serving to significantly improve wildlife habitats.

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Summary Findings

  • The Habitat Buffers for Upland Birds practice (CP33) is the first Federal conservation practice to target species-specific population recovery goals of a national wildlife conservation initiative (the Northern Bobwhite Conservation Initiative).
  • Over 14 states, breeding bobwhite densities were 70 to 75 percent greater around CP33 buffered fields than around unbuffered crop fields.
  • Fall bobwhite covey densities were 50 to 110 percent greater around CP33 fields than around unbuffered crop fields, and this positive response to CP33 increased each subsequent year of the study.
  • Several upland songbirds (e.g., dickcissel, field sparrow) responded strongly to CP33 in the landscape.
  • Area-sensitive grassland birds (e.g.,grasshopper sparrow) exhibited little response to CP33 buffers.
  • These findings illustrate the wildlife value of field borders and other buffer practices implemented through EQIP, WHIP, and other conservation programs.
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The conservation provisions of the Farm Bill can produce more consistent positive wildlife habitat benefits when policy (program statutes, rules, practices, and practice standards) is developed in the context of explicit goals identified as part of large-scale conservation initiatives.

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Review of the available literature on the ecological and economic impact of ecosystem services provided by  bats. Read More »


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Invasive Species introduced into the United States from around the globe are affecting plant and animal communities on our farms, ranches and coasts; and in our parks, waters, forests, and backyards. As global climate patterns shift, the distribution of species will change, and so will the susceptibility of particular habitats to the impacts of new species introductions. Human activity such as trade, travel and tourism have all increased substantially, increasing the speed and volume of species movement to unprecedented levels. Invasive species are often unintended hitchhikers on cargo and other trade conveyances. Still more species are deliberately introduced as pets, ornamental plants, crops, food, or for recreation, pest control or other purposes. Most nonnative species, including most of our sources of food and fiber, are not harmful; and many are highly beneficial. A small percentage of nonnative species cause great harm to the environment, the economy or human health. Nonnative species that cause harm are collectively known as invasive species. Read More »


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Non-native plants, animals, and microorganisms found outside of their natural range can become invasive. While many of these are harmless because they do not reproduce or spread in their new surroundings, other non-native species (NNIS) are considered invasive if they can cause harm to the economy, ecology or human health of the new environment. These species thrive in new areas because they establish relatively quickly, tolerate a wide range of conditions, are easily dispersed, and are no longer limited by the diseases, predators, and parasites that kept their populations in check in their native range.

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A Prescribed Fire Association is a group of landowners and other concerned citizens that form a partnership to conduct prescribed burns. Prescribed burning is the key land management tool used to restore and maintain native plant communities to their former diversity and productivity for livestock production and wildlife habitat. Native prairies, shrublands, and forests supply the majority of livestock forage and much of the wildlife habitat in the U.S. Without fire, many native plant communities become dysfunctional and unproductive. Research has clearly shown that there is no substitute for fire. 

Many forest and grassland ecosystems are fire dependent and not burning is poor land management.  Why do not more people use prescribed fire to manage their land? First, fire was not part of the European culture that settled in post-Columbian America. Fire exclusion and fire suppression has been engrained in our society for years and popularized by the very successful Smokey the Bear ad campaign. The result has been a rapid decline in the quality of our natural resources, along with costing taxpayers millions of dollars each year to fight wildfires and the many other negative consequences of fuel build up. This article has been adapted from Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Association. Read More »


A summary of all the benefits of prescribed fire in southern forests.

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This 40-page document provides detailed information on the biology of wild pigs, how to recognize their presence, the type of damage they can cause to agriculture and natural areas and a wide range of management techniques, including hunting.  It applies to just about anywhere in the U.S. where wild pigs are found.

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Gives an overview of prevention techniques for live fish, shellfish, ornamental fish and invertebrates, aquatic plants, marine shrimp and freshwater prawns. A list of all Southern Regional Aquaculture Center factsheets (more than 150) are available at https://srac.tamu.edu/index.cfm/event/viewAllSheets/

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Discusses pathogens and parasites, genetic alterations, and genetically modified organisms. A list of all Southern Regional Aquaculture Center factsheets (more than 150) are available at https://srac.tamu.edu/index.cfm/event/viewAllSheets/ Read More »


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A must-read for any responsible aquaculturist contemplating non-native species production. A list of all Southern Regional Aquaculture Center factsheets (more than 150) are available at https://srac.tamu.edu/index.cfm/event/viewAllSheets/

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A diversity of habitats is required throughout the lifecycle of the prairie-chicken to provide food and shelter. Planting to improve lesser prairie-chicken habitat requires not only the correct species of grasses, wildflowers, and shrubs, but, also the selections which have proven success or which are locally adapted. Proper management of lesser prairie-chicken habitat maintains plant diversity and keeps unwanted plant species from invading. Management with other uses, such as grazing, are very effective and benefit both livestock and wildlife.

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Strategies and cost estimates for various forms of frightening programs and exclusion or barrier methods of control. A list of all Southern Regional Aquaculture Center factsheets (more than 150) are available at https://srac.tamu.edu/index.cfm/event/viewAllSheets/ Read More »

BMPs oriented more specifically toward farming & agriculture, wildlife habitat and energy efficiency are also available on this site.

Invasive Species news from the Houston Conservation Center
The following news articles are provided by the Google News service and do not reflect the views or imply an endorsement by the Houston Conservation Center and its affiliates. We cannot guarantee the relevance of the content of this page or any links that may be followed from the articles herein.
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Lake Nacogdoches' giant salvinia infestation spreads
KTRE
The fight against giant salvinia is one shared across East Texas. The invasive species has been clogging lakes for years, including Lake Nacogdoches. And, recently Texas Parks and Wildlife biologists have noticed the plant spreading. "We don't want to ...




ABC News

At some Texas ranches, hunting exotic animals is touted as a way to support conservation efforts
ABC News
With its rolling hills, lush vegetation and sunlit canopies, the Ox Ranch looks like a scene straight out of an African savanna. The 18,000-acre preserve is home to 60 species of the world's most majestic animals, from giraffes and Cape buffalo to ...




easttexasmatters.com

SHARK WEEK 2018: What to watch
easttexasmatters.com
TYLER, Texas (KETK) - SHARK WEEK dives deeper than ever before when television's longest-running and most anticipated summer event returns for its 30th anniversary on Sunday, July 22 and continues through Sunday, July 29. After three decades and ...

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Nueces County Record Star

Seven Grants Awarded by Winners of Great Texas Birding Classic
Nueces County Record Star
Project: Gator Lake Reclamation- Submitted by South Texas Botanical Gardens and Nature Center, Inc. Funding will assist with the removal of invasive species such as salt cedar, giant cane, Chinese tallow, chinaberry, Brazilian pepper trees and guinea ...




Kankakee Daily Journal

OUTDOORS: Cormorants common again in Illinois
Kankakee Daily Journal
These goose-sized seabirds have winter range from Southern Illinois to the Gulf Coast and from Texas to the Atlantic. They also occupy inland lakes and ... the agency's Migratory Bird Program. A 2015 study of double-crested cormorant feeding in the ...




Fox 35 Orlando

Scorpions hiding in homes for relief from Texas heat
Fox 35 Orlando
Texas Park and Wildlife officials say scorpions are invading people's homes as they try to keep cool during this week's 100-plus degree temperatures. ... There are about 1,500 known scorpion species worldwide, according to the state agency's website.
The Heat in Texas is So Bad Scorpions Are Invading HomesRare.us

all 8 news articles »



austin360

Grackles are everywhere, so they must be invasive, right?
austin360
... grackles might seem like they are taking over the city, University of Texas biology professor and longtime birder Peter English doesn't consider grackles invasive or even dominant because they are not taking resources away from another bird species.

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KVUE.com

Central Texas cities worried zebra mussels could cause problems for drinking water
KVUE.com
Zebra mussels continue to spread throughout Central Texas -- quickly infecting area lakes.But three cities in Williamson County are working together to stop the invasive species from causing problems for their drinking water. Published: 5:20 PM CDT ...




NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Zebra mussels found in Grapevine Lake
easttexasmatters.com
GRAPEVINE, Texas (KETK) - Invasive zebra mussels have been discovered in Grapevine Lake, a popular outdoor recreation destination in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. ... Zebra mussels can harm native freshwater mussels and other aquatic species, affect ...
Invasive Zebra Mussels Found in Grapevine LakeNBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth
These nasty critters clog pipes and cut your feet. They were found in this DFW lakeFort Worth Star Telegram
'They're a nuisance': Zebra mussels spread to Grapevine LakeWFAA.com

all 9 news articles »



Spectrum News

UT researchers work to control increasing 'crazy ant' species
Spectrum News
AUSTIN, Texas — It is not just people moving into our area every day, but also swarms of an invasive ant species. University of Texas at Austin researchers at the Brackenridge Field Laboratory are now trying to get their population under control ...


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